Langue au chat?

Non! Cette langue-là, je la mange!

Photo: Kjell-Jørgen Myrtveit
Photo: Kjell-Jørgen Myrtveit
lofoten-fiskebater
Photo: Kjell-Jørgen Myrtveit

Every year, between January and April, a great miracle occurs in Northern Norway. The cod of the Barents Sea come to spawn in the archipelago of the Lofoten islands. A journey of several hundred kilometers! For centuries, fishermen from all over the Norwegian West coast have joined the seasonal fishery of the migratory cod. There is no rest in the Lofoten islands during the winter months. Everyone works. Children too!

Vesterålen
Photo (CC): Redningsselskapet

The children’s task is to cut the cod tongue “torsketunge”. We say tongue, but in fact they cut the jaw, and we eat the jaw.  The cod tongue is a delicacy. Crispy cod tongues are among the best things one can eat in Norway in the winter. Crispy outside, and softly melting inside. Deliciously juicy and salty.

The preparation is very simple. After washing them and cutting the superfluous skins, coat the tongues with flour and pan-fry them in butter. It’s ready! Serve them with potatoes and grated carrots with caper mayonnaise.

Ingredients: cod tongues (around 250-300 g per person), flour, pepper and butter.

img_4108
A cod “tongue”.
img_4109
Cut the skin between the jaws.
img_4112
The tongue after the skin is cut.
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Coat the tongues with flour, salt and pepper.
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Pan-fry them in butter.
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Voilà!

Caper mayonnaise is simple to make. Chop a table spoon of capers and add to your regular mayonnaise (egg yolk, Dijon mustard, sunflower oil,  a teaspoon of white wine vinegar, salt and pepper). To obtain a light mayonnaise, beat the egg white in snow, and mix some of it, about 1/3 part, to the mayonnaise – not all to avoid a dominant egg white taste.

img_4119
Add beaten egg white to the mayonnaise.

You think that eating cod tongues is odd? Then look at this video of the world championship in cutting tongues!

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